Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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74% of shoppers ready to share data over in-store Wi-Fi if they can get offers

74% of shoppers ready to share data over in-store Wi-Fi if they can get offers

74% of shoppers are ready to share basic personal data over in-store Wi-Fi if it means they will receive discounts on products they are interested in, new research by Hughes Europe reveals.

Ergonomic Solutions introduces SpacePole Stack: Taking payment mounting solutions to another level

Ergonomic Solutions introduces SpacePole Stack: Taking payment mounting solutions to another level

Ergonomic Solutions has announced the launch of SpacePole Stack, an innovative payment mounting solution which enhances its existing range by offering an advanced composite solution which addresses many of the common issues found when mounting payment terminals.

Blue Yonder’s technology delivers improved product availability for Morrisons with shelf gaps down 30%

Blue Yonder’s technology delivers improved product availability for Morrisons with shelf gaps down 30%

Blue Yonder, the provider of artificial intelligence and machine learning applications for retail, has partnered with Morrisons to optimise replenishment and automate ordering of 26,000 ambient and long-life product SKUs in all its 491 stores.

Twiggle unveils search technology ‘that allows any online retail company to take on e-commerce giants’

Twiggle unveils search technology ‘that allows any online retail company to take on e-commerce giants’

Twiggle has announced the debut of its Semantic API, which instantly gives retailers the ability to add a semantic layer to their existing search engines and interact with their online customers in a more personal and natural way.

How retailers can use technology to become data driven in a multi-channel world

How retailers can use technology to become data driven in a multi-channel world

By Peter Ruffley, Chairman at Zizo.

The retail market has changed; Amazon et al have transformed customer expectations; digital native millennials have a very different outlook to previous generations; and the influence of external factors such as social media can be both good and bad.

UK retailers wasting £90,000 on legacy telephony each year

UK retailers wasting £90,000 on legacy telephony each year

New research reveals that the average retailer is wasting almost £90,000 a year on unnecessary and out-dated telephony systems.

Harting Integrated Industry solutions featuring RFID systems and smart digital retrofit systems

Harting Integrated Industry solutions featuring RFID systems and smart digital retrofit systems

At the Industry 4.0 summit, Manchester Central Convention Complex, 4-5 April 2017, Harting (stand V25) will show its range of Industry 4.0 solutions, incorporating Modular Integrated Computer Architecture for industrial networking, and RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) systems.

Use mobile data capture to streamline everyday retail processes

Use mobile data capture to streamline everyday retail processes

By Samuel Mueller, CEO, Scandit.

Retailers can obtain a wealth of real-time enterprise data with mobile barcode scans.

From scrolling to sales: the future of mobile retailing

From scrolling to sales: the future of mobile retailing

By Craig Smith, VP of solutions & customer success, Amplience.

Mobile retailing has become a pivotal milestone in consumer buying habits, with over half of online sales being made through mobile devices, reports IMRG.

RFID: Fact or Fiction?

RFID: Fact or Fiction?

By Andrew Blatherwick, Chairman, RELEX Solutions.

The industry may have been talking about RFID for 20 years, but it still has not come into common use or delivered significant value to retailers.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

 

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.