Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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ZTE wins Best Wireless Broadband Innovation award for Pre5G massive MIMO

ZTE wins Best Wireless Broadband Innovation award for Pre5G massive MIMO

ZTE Corporation, a major international provider of telecommunications, enterprise and consumer technology solutions for mobile Internet, has won the Best Wireless Broadband Innovation award for its Pre5G massive multiple input, multiple output (MIMO) technology at Broadband World Forum in London.

Two new intelligent business scanners from Epson

Two new intelligent business scanners from Epson

Epson has announced two new intelligent, compact, sheet-fed WorkForce scanners. With powerful media handling and smart features to offer a high level of data integrity, the WorkForce DS-570W and DS-530 are geared towards highly-efficient and simple integration into an organisation's workflow.

New DENSO scanners with RFID and NFC

New DENSO scanners with RFID and NFC

The proverb "April showers bring May flowers" also applies to October apparently. DENSO Auto-ID Business Unit starts the fourth quarter of this calendar year with the launch of two new products.

Ergonomic Solutions expands footprint in Middle East through distribution agreement with Almoe Digital Solutions

Ergonomic Solutions expands footprint in Middle East through distribution agreement with Almoe Digital Solutions

Ergonomic Solutions has signed a distribution agreement with Almoe Digital Solutions to act as its qualified distribution partner for the Middle East region.

Datalogic awards Retail Manager Solutions with ISV partner status

Datalogic awards Retail Manager Solutions with ISV partner status

Datalogic has announced that RMS has been awarded ISV status in its Partner Advantage Programme.

New digital radio system cleared for takeoff at London Gatwick Airport

New digital radio system cleared for takeoff at London Gatwick Airport

Motorola Solutions is launching its MOTOTRBO Capacity Max system at London Gatwick Airport in the south of England, alongside authorised channel partner Servicom.

87% of students prefer to pay with cards over cash

87% of students prefer to pay with cards over cash

87% of students prefer to pay for goods using debit and credit cards, either contactless or Chip and PIN, a survey by Vista Retail Support has found.

Sentient launches AI-powered real-time personalisation tools for retailers

Sentient launches AI-powered real-time personalisation tools for retailers

Sentient Technologies has added several new features to its flagship retail product, Sentient Aware.

Voiteq inspection solution takes Voice beyond the warehouse

Voiteq inspection solution takes Voice beyond the warehouse

Voiteq - global provider of Voice-directed work solutions, traditionally associated with warehouse operations - is driving the wider use of its Voice technology to include inspection tasks - eliminating the need for pens, paper and clipboards.

Data-rich retailers lack customer identity insight

Data-rich retailers lack customer identity insight

Amido, a vendor-agnostic technical consultancy specialising in assembling and integrating proven cloud technologies to improve customer identity and data management, reports that c-suite leaders in retail are struggling to find value in the data they hold about their customers owing to the inadequate integration of their siloed data.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

 

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.