Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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Five trends in IT and digital communications in 2017

Five trends in IT and digital communications in 2017

Continued digitisation of documentation and mobile workforces. But also continued strong growth for Push to Talk in areas such as security, crisis, logistics and healthcare. GroupTalks CEO Magnus Hedberg writes about what he believes are the strongest trends in IT and digital communications in 2017.

ASOS partners with Klarna to launch pay after delivery in Nordics

ASOS partners with Klarna to launch pay after delivery in Nordics

In order to make online payments more flexible for shoppers, ASOS has partnered with one of Europe's leading payments providers, Klarna, and their pay after delivery technology following a successful partnership in Germany over the past three years.

Datalogic chosen for barcode scanning solution by PayPoint

Datalogic chosen for barcode scanning solution by PayPoint

Datalogic has announced that PayPoint has chosen the Heron barcode scanner for its PayPoint One EPoS platform.

Mahindra Comviva positioned in Gartner Market Guide for Digital Wallet Solutions

Mahindra Comviva positioned in Gartner Market Guide for Digital Wallet Solutions

Mahindra Comviva, the provider mobility solutions, has been positioned in the prestigious Gartner Market Guide for Digital Wallet Solutions for its mobiquity platform.

Conversational commerce: why the future of retail convenience lies in messaging apps and chatbots

Conversational commerce: why the future of retail convenience lies in messaging apps and chatbots

Consumer engagement is about to take another seismic leap, as a new wave of conversation commerce technologies is about to reshape the way we shop, explains SQLI CEO, Kevin Ludford.

The retail sector has made enormous investment in bringing digital and physical channels closer together in recent years, in order to better serve the end consumer.

DSales introduces new mobile ID and print authentication

DSales introduces new mobile ID and print authentication

The latest version of ineoPRINT v3.4.0 now supports ID and print authentication via a mobile device (Android / iOS).

Sionic Mobile supercharges its ION Commerce Engine with IBM Watson Analytics

Sionic Mobile supercharges its ION Commerce Engine with IBM Watson Analytics

Sionic Mobile has announced its award-winning ION Commerce Engine (ICE) now features automated data analysis and data-driven dashboards powered by IBM Watson Analytics, enabling partners and retailers to better engage and connect with millions of Mobile Rewards App users nationwide.

Mahindra Comviva, in collaboration with Mobile World Live, releases telecom survey report

Mahindra Comviva, in collaboration with Mobile World Live, releases telecom survey report

Mahindra Comviva, provider of mobility solutions, has released "The Business of Tomorrows" survey report.

Contactless payment? Beware the Christmas debt hangover

Contactless payment? Beware the Christmas debt hangover

Consumers planning to pay for their Christmas shopping by contactless could be in store for a nasty New Year shock, according to research from a London Business School professor whose prior findings would suggest touchless payment could see Christmas shoppers rack up an unprecedented amount of festive debt this year.

KPMG and Ivalua align to improve end-to-end source-to-pay capabilities

KPMG and Ivalua align to improve end-to-end source-to-pay capabilities

KPMG LLP and Ivalua, the spend management solutions provider, have announced an alliance to combine Ivalua's source-to-pay (S2P) cloud platform with KPMG's proven procurement process, implementation and change management capabilities.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

 

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.