Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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AI in business: 2019 trends and predictions

AI in business: 2019 trends and predictions

AI is already being implemented in businesses around the world, and while worries persist over whether robots will be taking over the workplace, some are predicting that it will actually improve and even create jobs in the future.

DENSO at the LogiMAT 2019 – Innovative handhelds and an RFID sled

DENSO at the LogiMAT 2019 – Innovative handhelds and an RFID sled

As part of the Toyota Group and inventor of the QR Code, DENSO specialises in the development of innovative data collection devices.

John Lewis & Partners signs Qubist for partner advocacy program

John Lewis & Partners signs Qubist for partner advocacy program

Following a successful pilot, Qubist, the Employee Advocacy app, has announced that John Lewis & Partners has rolled out its proprietary award-winning advocacy technologyacross its 51 stores nationwide.

Fastbitcoins.com launches to allow everyday punters to buy Bitcoin with ease in physical outlets - or even the back of a cab

Fastbitcoins.com launches to allow everyday punters to buy Bitcoin with ease in physical outlets - or even the back of a cab

Today, Fastbitcoins.com, a service that allows everyday people to easily and safely buy bitcoins in physical retail outlets using cash, announces its public launch.

Datalogic announces the new Gryphon 4500 Serie

Datalogic announces the new Gryphon 4500 Serie

Datalogic, the automatic data capture and process automation solutions provider, has announced the new Gryphon 4500 series of wireless scanners, a premium level of 2D hand held readers for general purpose applications, that now offers both wireless communications and new wireless battery charging models.

82% of UK employees will buy more often from their workplace canteen with order ahead technology, finds Omnico

82% of UK employees will buy more often from their workplace canteen with order ahead technology, finds Omnico

82% of UK employees will buy meals more often from their workplace canteen or restaurant if they can order ahead and pick up their meal from a dedicated service point, research by Omnico and The Caterer magazine has found.

Memor 10 rugged mobile computer by Datalogic: Dare to be smart

Memor 10 rugged mobile computer by Datalogic: Dare to be smart

Datalogic, the automatic data capture and process automation solutions provider, has introduced the Memor 10 rugged mobile computer, one of the few rugged devices validated by the ‘Android Enterprise Recommended’ program from Google.

Smartrac announces comprehensive Green Tag Program, taking a holistic approach

Smartrac announces comprehensive Green Tag Program, taking a holistic approach

Smartrac has unveiled its Green Tag Program to the public. In addition to its existing commitment to minimise any possible ecological impact of its manufacturing processes, the RFID and IoT pacesetter has taken on an obligation to manufacture RFID products that live up to a true sustainability promise even under strict Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) scrutiny.

34% of UK consumers disappointed by availability of flexible finance

34% of UK consumers disappointed by availability of flexible finance

More than a third of consumers feel let down by the lack of flexible finance products offered by UK businesses, according to a research study.

The new Matrix 220 imager by Datalogic - One model for any scanning requirement

The new Matrix 220 imager by Datalogic - One model for any scanning requirement

Datalogic, the automatic data capture and process automation solutions provider, has introduced the new Matrix 220 imager, a highly compact image-based barcode reader capable of providing top performance with the highest flexibility.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

 

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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