Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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MYHSM Payment HSM as a service provides building block for ACI Worldwide’s cloud-deployed solutions

MYHSM Payment HSM as a service provides building block for ACI Worldwide’s cloud-deployed solutions

MYHSM’s  cloud-based Payment Hardware Security Module (HSM) service can now be added to ACI Worldwide's solutions as a building block of a comprehensive cloud payments strategy for acquirers, issuers, payment processors and banks.

Half of British professionals state technology hinders work-life balance

Half of British professionals state technology hinders work-life balance

Some 80% of employees hoped that tech-enabled remote working capabilities would give them better work-life balance.

Checkpoint Systems announces partnership with Retail Risk

Checkpoint Systems announces partnership with Retail Risk

Supplier of loss prevention solutions and retail security, Checkpoint Systems UK, has been announced as the title sponsor of the upcoming Retail Risk Conference in London on 2 April 2020.

Reward schemes and regular feedback more effective motivation than financial incentives

Reward schemes and regular feedback more effective motivation than financial incentives

A new survey of retail sector customer support employees has found that reward schemes are more effective than financial incentives when it comes to boosting employee motivation.

Operating in a disruptive market

Operating in a disruptive market

By David Patek - founder and CEO of Neeco Global ICT Services.

Knowledge is power, so the saying goes, and we are living in an age where knowledge has never been more democratic or accessible. Technology has opened up international markets bringing indiscriminate opportunity to businesses, whether small or large.

Optimising store inventory and fulfilment with RFID

Optimising store inventory and fulfilment with RFID

The demand for flexible fulfilment is growing. Consumers expect inventory availability information and flexible fulfilment options that support their busy lifestyles, whether it’s shopping online with a view into local store inventory, selecting to pick up their online purchases in-store or opting for same-day delivery to meet an immediate need.

Payment Pain Points – a fraction is too much friction for shoppers

Payment Pain Points – a fraction is too much friction for shoppers

With demand for friction free payment transactions, such as contactless payments, using cards and digital wallet, are predicted to grow by 300% globally over the next five years1, retailers need to diversify and reimagine the traditional point of payment in-store and online, RetailEXPO’s latest report suggests.

Ingenico Enterprise Retail collaborates with 3C Payment to deliver new technology and enhance security for merchants

Ingenico Enterprise Retail collaborates with 3C Payment to deliver new technology and enhance security for merchants

Ingenico Enterprise Retail, part of Ingenico Group, the seamless payments solutions provider, and 3C Payment, an independent Global Payment Service provider, have expanded their relationship, to bring to market two new terminal solutions which process payments through the 3C Integra Payment Gateway with Ingenico’s DESK/5000 & MOVE/5000 payment terminal devices.

Contactless payment transactions to reach US$6 trillion globally by 2024, fuelled by increased card use

Contactless payment transactions to reach US$6 trillion globally by 2024, fuelled by increased card use

New data from Juniper Research forecasts that global contactless transaction values will reach nearly $6 trillion in 2024, up from $2 trillion in 2020. It found that this increase will be driven by significant growth in OEM Pay and contactless card transaction values, especially in the US.

Omni-ID announces new range of IoT devices

Omni-ID announces new range of IoT devices

Omni-ID, the developer of passive industrial radio frequency identification (RFID) tags that are relied on by major global organisations to provide information on the location and identity of assets, has announced the launch of a new range of, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and Long Range (LoRa) - enabled devices.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

 

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

Editorial: +44 (0)1892 536363
Publisher: +44 (0)208 440 0372
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