Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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How to grow your business using data for everyone

How to grow your business using data for everyone

The world of retail has always been fiercely competitive but the pandemic has meant it’s harder than ever for companies to succeed.  So how can retailers make sure they’re able to prosper in a difficult market? Marcos Monterio, CEO, Veezoo, explains why data that’s easily accessed, is the key.

UK consumer spending up a third since pre-pandemic

UK consumer spending up a third since pre-pandemic

Data released by UTP Merchant Services, provider of credit card machines to small and medium size businesses, reveals consumer spending is up on average by a third (32%) across the UK since Covid-19 restrictions eased, compared with an equivalent period pre-pandemic in April 2019.

The Digital Divide: Research reveals discord between marketers’ actions and consumers’ behaviours

The Digital Divide: Research reveals discord between marketers’ actions and consumers’ behaviours

The ever-evolving digital landscape, with its ever-increasing online channels, is posing significant challenges on marketers to understand how best to interact with their customers. 

Intelligent promotion in retail – the vital ingredient of consumer experience

Intelligent promotion in retail – the vital ingredient of consumer experience

Consumers are in a stronger position than ever in their relationships with brands and retailers, and their satisfaction and loyalty come with a high price tag. To meet their expectations, retailers need to provide personalised and memorable shopping experiences. Promotions have a key role to play in this.

Eurotech joins the O-RAN Alliance to accelerate the development and deployment of scalable 5G network applications at the edge

Eurotech joins the O-RAN Alliance to accelerate the development and deployment of scalable 5G network applications at the edge

Eurotech, provider of rugged embedded and edge computers and IoT components enabling end-to-end applications, has joined the O-RAN Alliance to enable a faster design, development and deployment of 5G network applications at the edge, leveraging its High Performance Edge Computing (HPEC) systems.

Stocard launches free, unconditional buyers’ protection with Stocard Pay to offer a holistic shopping experience

Stocard launches free, unconditional buyers’ protection with Stocard Pay to offer a holistic shopping experience

Stocard, the European mobile wallet, has launched a free buyers’ protection for all Stocard Pay users. All purchases made, both, online and offline, with the virtual Stocard card are insured for 45 days and for an amount up to 250 euros.

The digital training gap: Just 14% of retail’s frontline workforce receive training on their mobile devices

The digital training gap:  Just 14% of retail’s frontline workforce receive training on their mobile devices

As non-essential retail reopens, retail staff are facing a digital training gap, with store associates reporting a lack of digital training formats and infrequent learning opportunities, the latest report from digital workplace innovator, YOOBIC, warns.

Domino helps customers reduce risk and optimise production with new vision inspection systems

Domino helps customers reduce risk and optimise production with new vision inspection systems

Domino Printing Sciences (Domino) has launched the R-Series, a range of smart vision systems for automatic inspection and validation of product codes, including date codes, batch numbers, barcodes, and 2D-printed codes.

Seven in ten shoppers claim sharing data with retailers isn’t worth the spammy marketing

Seven in ten shoppers claim sharing data with retailers isn’t worth the spammy marketing

Seven in ten (71%) shoppers have blamed ‘spammy’ marketing bombardment as a key reason they don’t connect with brands via their mobile devices in-store, according to a new study by retail innovation agency Outform.

Retail fraud teams to grow following surge in online fraud during pandemic

Retail fraud teams to grow following surge in online fraud during pandemic

Retailers around the world are increasing their fraud teams and budgets because of a significant rise in all types of online fraud during the pandemic, research by fraud detection and payment acceptance specialist Ravelin finds.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

Radio-frequency identification (RFID)

RFID is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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