Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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Paysafe’s Neteller launches Knect customer reward programme

Paysafe’s Neteller launches Knect customer reward programme

Neteller, powered by specialised payments platform Paysafe, has launched Neteller Knect. Neteller Knect is a loyalty programme that rewards customers for choosing to pay with their Neteller digital wallet.  It has launched in over 100 countries.

UK businesses lose £37 billion every year through poor spending controls

UK businesses lose £37 billion every year through poor spending controls

Soldo, the European pay and spend automation platform, has unveiled a new Coleman Parkes study it commissioned which found that the UK economy loses around £37 billion a year through poor business spending controls. 

JCB sees online sales in Europe increase by more than 300% from 2016 to 2019, as online spending among cardmembers boom

JCB sees online sales in Europe increase by more than 300% from 2016 to 2019, as online spending among cardmembers boom

JCB International Co., Ltd., the international operations subsidiary of JCB Co., Ltd., has seen impressive growth in virtual spending with European retailers from its Asian cardmember base, with online sales growing by more than 300% across the continent between 2016 and 2019.

TRG welcomes payments industry veteran Liz Everett

TRG welcomes payments industry veteran Liz Everett

TRG, the global managed solutions provider focused on enterprise mobility, point of sale and payments, has welcomed payments industry veteran Liz Everett as a Director of Payment Solutions.

Dakota achieves Platinum Partnership Status with Honeywell

Dakota achieves Platinum Partnership Status with Honeywell

Dakota Integrated Solutions Ltd, a real-time technology, printing, mobility and digital data capture solution specialist, has achieved Platinum Partnership Status with Honeywell. This latest accolade for Dakota means that they are now able to offer Honeywell’s entire product range, including Voice-directed technology and solutions.

Rebuilding the ‘forgotten’ frontline: Store associates say lack of communication creates the biggest challenge at work

Rebuilding the ‘forgotten’ frontline: Store associates say lack of communication creates the biggest challenge at work

As non-essential retail prepares to reopen, retail staff risk becoming a ‘forgotten frontline’, with store associates reporting a lack recognition and empowerment in their roles, the latest report from digital workplace solutions provider, YOOBIC, warns.

The one-stop shop advantage

The one-stop shop advantage

Retail Technology Review spoke with Philip Jarrett, commercial director of Dakota Integrated Solutions, about the company’s focus on a one-stop shop data capture solutions service for customers in a variety of sectors, together with the company’s new focus on Voice-directed solutions provision.

Mobile payment tokenisation revenue to exceed $53 billion globally by 2025, as OEM pays & wallets drive adoption

Mobile payment tokenisation revenue to exceed $53 billion globally by 2025, as OEM pays & wallets drive adoption

A new study from Juniper Research has found that revenue from tokenisation provisioning and management in mobile payments will exceed $53 billion in 2025, from $18 billion in 2020.

Fashion retailer GANT rolls out Cegid software across international business

Fashion retailer GANT rolls out Cegid software across international business

GANT, the branded apparel retailer with over 750 stores in 80 countries, is close to completing a rollout of Cegid Retail’s Unified Commerce Platform across Europe in a bid to improve stock management and customer service across multiple channels and territories.

Survey shows texting is vital for retailers marketing strategy in 2021

Survey shows texting is vital for retailers marketing strategy in 2021

Popular non-essential retail shops are set to reopen in a few weeks, in line with rules for shoppers returning to the high-street easing on 12 April. For those without an online offering, this means welcoming back customers after months of uncertainty.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

Radio-frequency identification (RFID)

RFID is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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