Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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No internet? No problem: how retailers can improve their customer experience even without connectivity

No internet? No problem: how retailers can improve their customer experience even without connectivity

By Huw Owen, Head of EMEA & APJ at Couchbase.

We live in a mobile world: a quick glance at the street or train carriage will surely reveal armies of people busy scrolling on their phones or tablets. All of them will expect a reliable connection as standard. 

Giving a voice to maintenance and inspection

Giving a voice to maintenance and inspection

Retail Technology Review spoke with Phil Jarrett, commercial director of Dakota Integrated Solutions, and Paul Whittingham, operations director of Truckfile, about the companies’ partnership and what voice maintenance and inspection technology offers technicians within the freight transport sector.

The sensitive shelf

The sensitive shelf

Sensitivity to price and promotions among consumers is at an all-time high post pandemic, according to new research. So how can retailers react quickly to give their customers the information and reassurance they are seeking, as well as boost margin, asks Duncan Potter, CMO, Pricer. 

PizzaExpress improves efficiences and savings with Qlik Cloud

PizzaExpress improves efficiences and savings with Qlik Cloud

Qlik has announced that restaurant group PizzaExpress has deployed Qlik Cloud to enable employees across the business in the UK with access to real-time data for improved decision-making, resulting in annual savings and more empowered restaurant managers.

Increased risk for cyberattacks on businesses since start of the pandemic

Increased risk for cyberattacks on businesses since start of the pandemic

Avast, the digital security and privacy solutions provider, has revealed that the overall chance of business users encountering a cyber threat has increased worldwide year over year by 24%, from 11.25% to 13.9%.

Despite SCA, fraudsters will always be on the look out for new weaknesses to exploit

Despite SCA, fraudsters will always be on the look out for new weaknesses to exploit

By Shagun Varshney, Signifyd Senior Product Manager, Payment Solutions.

When the good guys and their technology find ways to clamp down one form of fraud,  fraudsters storm back with a new scheme.

What does the Edge mean for IoT?

What does the Edge mean for IoT?

A lot has been written about the IoT revolution and how the technology has the capability to revolutionise industries, transform productivity and unlock new levels of insight. But for those intrigued by the possibilities and looking to dip their toe in the water, the potential myths of high price point, infrastructure and connectivity challenges, as well as the required skill set can be significant hurdles that seem insurmountable.

Logo visibility in email could revitalize consumer interaction

Logo visibility in email could revitalize consumer interaction

By Sabrina Evans, Red Sift.

Email is vital for any business, it's the structural glue that underpins the key lines of communication between company and consumer. From promoting new products and offers to sending tracking updates and invoices, email is the foundation which keeps the wheels of ecommerce turning. But as with anything, the evolution of how businesses use this channel is inevitable, making it work harder for their goals and needs.

Uncover the potential of RFID with Checkpoint Systems at Retail Risk London

Uncover the potential of RFID with Checkpoint Systems at Retail Risk London

Offering insights into the most effective, tried and tested approaches to managing retail risk, supplier of loss prevention solutions and retail technology, Checkpoint Systems UK, has revealed the conference agenda for its upcoming appearance as title sponsor at Retail Risk London on 22 July 2021.

New line of Honeywell rugged, mobile computers empowers workers to better support growing e-commerce demands

New line of Honeywell rugged, mobile computers empowers workers to better support growing e-commerce demands

Honeywell has announced its latest family of rugged enterprise mobile devices designed for workers that pick, pack, sort and deliver e-commerce orders to keep the retail supply chain moving smoothly from factory to consumer.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

Radio-frequency identification (RFID)

RFID is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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