Retail Data Capture Technology News

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service.

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5 steps for a successful implementation of voice-guided picking

5 steps for a successful implementation of voice-guided picking

Fast growing order volumes, a higher cost pressure and increasing demands on process quality: logistics companies are still facing the challenge of making internal warehouse processes more cost-effective, more efficient and at the same time less error prone.

BEC implements a voice-enabled data capture scanning solution at Flowervision

BEC implements a voice-enabled data capture scanning solution at Flowervision

BEC (Systems Integration) Ltd interviews Nick Hudson, General Manager at Flowervision (Bristol) Ltd, and discusses how he and Managing Director Andrew Jones and his team worked with BEC to create and implement a voice-enabled data capture scanning solution.

Mail Handling International pushes the envelope with Datalogic barcode scanning technology

Mail Handling International pushes the envelope with Datalogic barcode scanning technology

Mail Handling International (MHI) has revealed that Datalogic barcode scanning technology has enabled it to dramatically enhance speed and accuracy for the automatic enclosure of personalised letters from its Bristol based mail fulfilment centre. Combining Datalogic Matrix 300N barcode readers with software provided by Scansys, MHI can match and insert personalised letters into their corresponding envelopes at a rate of 4.16 items per second.

Peak achieves AWS Retail Competency Status

Peak achieves AWS Retail Competency Status

Peak has achieved Amazon Web Services (AWS) Retail Competency status. This accreditation supports Peak’s expansion to the US market, establishing itself as an AWS Retail and Machine Learning Competency Partner on a global scale.

Contextual commerce, loyalty, sustainability and payment preference will dominate eCommerce agendas in 2020, says Tryzens

Contextual commerce, loyalty, sustainability and payment preference will dominate eCommerce agendas in 2020, says Tryzens

2019 saw the retail sector continue to battle to keep ahead in an environment of rapid market, technological and consumer behaviour changes. Couple that with disrupted spending habits, both in terms of level of spend and the channels consumers prefer to buy through, as well as rising costs, the UK uncertainty surrounding Brexit, and increased international competition, it all added up to another challenging year for retailers.

ProGlove collaborates with Samsung to introduce solution that meets growing demand for wearable scanners in industrial environments

ProGlove collaborates with Samsung to introduce solution that meets growing demand for wearable scanners in industrial environments

Industry wearables company ProGlove, in collaboration with Samsung Electronics America, has announced a combined product solution to address the growing need for wearable scanners in industries ranging from retail, transportation, logistics and manufacturing.

Janam unveils rugged tablet

Janam unveils rugged tablet

Janam Technologies, a leading provider of rugged mobile computers that capture data and communicate wirelessly, has introduced what it describes as the most powerful and advanced 8-inch rugged tablet. 

New fully integrated UNO RF/RFID label offers improved performance and sustainability

New fully integrated UNO RF/RFID label offers improved performance and sustainability

Checkpoint Systems has launched a new version of its unique UNO RF/RFID label that will enhance supply chain visibility and loss prevention.

Capgemini report: Automation provides competitive advantage to retailers to bring customers back in store

Capgemini report: Automation provides competitive advantage to retailers to bring customers back in store

As automation technology continues to mature, it is becoming increasingly a point of competitive advantage, with consumers responding positively to the improved convenience that it can deliver. However, in order to capitalize on this trend, retailers will need to prioritize automation that creates positive consumer experiences rather than as a cost saving exercise, according to new research from the Capgemini Research Institute.

FutureProof Retail and SIRL announce 'last foot' shopper targeting and analytics

FutureProof Retail and SIRL announce 'last foot' shopper targeting and analytics

Together, the two companies will enable retailers to deploy FutureProof's mobile self-checkout and service counter solutions fully integrated with SIRL's Indoor GPS & customer analytics platform that offers shoppers personalized recommendations in real-time through activation at the "last foot" of their physical store journey.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart.

 

These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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